Steve Marzolf [editorial/content/strategy/copywriting]

work I've done, who I've done it with and what's happening now…

Posts Tagged ‘Manliness

HBO Boxing

In 2011, I took the lead on boxing content for HBO.com. In addition to managing the editorial for the site and HBO’s boxing blog InsideHBOBoxing.com, I oversaw robust content packages to support the network’s pay-per-view events. During a major fight week, I’d assign dozens of articles, produce stylized news videos live from Las Vegas, and live-tweet the night’s action from ringside via @HBOBoxing. I also worked to launch new digital content initiatives, including ‘Under the Lights,’ a “pause-and-play analysis” web exclusive that grew quickly in popularity. (The segment for Pacquiao-Marquez 4 embedded below received more than 1 million views on YouTube during the two weeks surrounding the fight).

Written by Steve

May 14, 2012 at 9:50 pm

Posted in HBO

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Wilderness E.R.

Maxim

Maxim

 

It’s tough to dig fall foliage with a tree limb gouging your pal’s torso. Here are some backwoods medic tips so you can play hero. See you on Dateline

Sliced: When your buddy’s need to knife-juggle turns your hike into a slasher flick, apply firm pressure for 10 minutes directly to the gash, says Dr. Paul S. Auerbach, author of Wilderness Medicine. If anything’s poking out – bones, robot innards – don’t put it back; you’ll introduce more bacteria. If your pal suddenly has clammy skin, a racing pulse, and shallow breathing, elevate his legs 30 degrees to pour blood back toward his heart to stave off shock. Camping is fun!

Smashed: When a limb is crushed by a falling Redwood, don’t try to amputate, regardless of how hopeless it seems or how bloodthirsty you are. “Once you cut a limb off … it’s off,” Auerbach says. But if the victim is trapped and your distance from doctors far outweighs his fear of shopping for single shoes, apply a tourniquet above the wound and just saw through it. Yum! If your pal doesn’t lose too much blood, he could have a full life of pirate impressions ahead of him.

Bitten: Assuming your trail bud wasn’t mauled to death by that kill-crazed liger, the key after an animal attack is to fully clean out the wounds. A bear, a wildcat, or an angry unicorn has more germs in its mouth than Amy Winehouse. According to Dr. Luanne Freer, a medical director at both Yellowstone and the Mount Everest Base Camp ER, “Simple dish soap will kill the rabies virus and get out the bacteria that can cause complications in the weeks to come.” So don’t forget to pack the Palmolive.

Gouged: Arrows, ski poles, javelins – no matter how ghastly it looks, don’t pull it out. Besides possibly shredding up more tissue, you’ll eliminate the one thing you’ve got going for you: a plug – the perfect stabilized state. “If it’s occluding a big blood vessel and you take it out, the person could bleed to death,” Auerbach says. If it’s not bleeding too badly, you have a little time (up to a day) before an infection kills him. “So, dude, you feel like finishing the hike and then heading to the ER?”

Burned: First, apply bandages. Then wrap them in plastic – keeping air off the scorched nerves diminishes the pain. And don’t underestimate simple meds. “Any anti-inflammatory will help,” says Freer. “I give Ibuprofen to some burn victims, even if I have narcotics.” Drinking lots of fluids is key. The body can lose liters of water in a few hours when there’s no skin left to retain it. In the meantime, give your ailing chum a stern talking to about how enflamed humans start forest fires, too. 

Written by Steve

December 9, 2008 at 3:45 am

Posted in Maxim

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How to Purchase …

… A RACEHORSE! 

Maxim

Maxim

 

Hitting the track is that much sweeter when you’re watching your own pony kick ass. Here’s how to make it happen. 

Name Your Price: Thoroughbreds aren’t cheap, so unless you spend your summers at the Kennedy compound in Cape Cod, you’ll probably need track-savvy buddies to split your horse’s cost and upkeep. “About 10 guys throwing in $5,000 each can get you a decent $25,000 horse and cover a year’s worth of training, stabling and feed,” says Daniel Metzger, president of the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association.

Shop Around:  You can buy an untrained animal straight from the farm, pick up a hot prospect at a “purchasing event” (a race in which a horse can be bought for a pre-determined amount), or hit a public auction and let the market dictate a fair price. In any case, hire a trainer beforehand at your local racetrack – that or risk a premature trip to the dog food factory.

Cover Your Assets: To guarantee you’re not the one who ends up sleeping in a barn, Metzger advises setting up an LLC (limited liability company) to separate your racing business from your personal assets. And be sure to elect your most responsible buddy “managing partner” so unpaid oats bills don’t get in the way of swilling bourbon in the winner’s circle, you cheap bastard.

Ride It to the Bank: The possibility of losing your shirt is real, but chances are you’ll recoup your investment through track winnings over the first year or two. And if you discover the next Secretariat, an early retirement could lead to millions in stud fees. “With a good racehorse, the real payoff is in the breeding shed,” says Metzger. “That’s where the real money’s at.”

 

… A MUSCLE CAR!

buymusclecar-lrA windowless van has utility, but a ’74 Camaro makes you even cooler than the kids who smoked in high school.

Stay Simple: Picking up a classic for less than 15 grand requires a few concessions – you’re not going to land a souped-up V8 or a custom trim. But a standard-issue second-generation muscle car is well within reach. Floyd Garrett, owner of the Muscle Car Museum in Sevierville, Tennessee, says the sweet spot for Camaro deals falls between 1970 and 1974.

Snoop Into the Past: Like that stripper at your brother’s bachelor party, you need to figure out where she’s been – but as long as her body holds up, anything else can be fixed. “If I found a ’69 Camaro with a good, solid body and the engine had a rod thrown out the side of it,” Garrett says, “that wouldn’t bother me a bit.” Beware of heavy undercoats hiding 30 years of Detroit winters, and check the trim tag on the firewall to see if the paint color changed – a clue to long hours spent at the body shop.

Keep it Real: The more original parts, the more valuable the car, so hunt under the hood for as many GM stamps as you can find. When it comes to making your own repairs, almost anything is fair game: radiators, alternators, starters, even entire engines can be swapped with moderate ease and expense.

Pimp Your Ride: While the ‘70s offered marvels like outrageous horsepower, sofalike backseats and Freddie Mercury, a few inventions from the golden age of chest hair fell short, namely brakes. Garrett advises replacing the front set of drum brakes with discs for the added convenience of being able to stop on command. 

Written by Steve

November 7, 2008 at 8:04 am

Posted in Maxim

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BBQ Guru

Master the activity that combines the two greatest things in life: meat and fire.

Written by Steve

November 6, 2008 at 2:42 pm

Posted in FHM

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‘Die Jaws!’

In the U.S. sharks attack an average of 32 people per year. So to help save lives, FHM is 60 miles off the coast of Point Pleasant, NJ, aboard a fishing boat that recently appeared on the Versus network show Shark Hunters: East vs. West. We’re here to hunt shark. Here’s how. 

Written by Steve

November 6, 2008 at 12:55 pm

Posted in FHM

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Local Legends

Road-tripping? Get plastered like a townie by shotgunning these top regional brews. 

Written by Steve

November 5, 2008 at 10:45 am

Posted in FHM

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Daredevils

The Adrenalin Crew give a crash course in stunts.

Written by Steve

November 3, 2008 at 11:31 pm

Posted in FHM

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